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Poster: Arbuthnot Date: Jul 5, 2011 7:37pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: gd10/28/90 Le Zenith

thank you for the informed critique; i did also enjoy much the Althea in the 1st set; i don't have near the number of listens to shows from this era as others here, so i appreciate any pointers or tips in the right direction; what would be a few shows that you would suggest from '90?

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Poster: bkidwell Date: Jul 5, 2011 8:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: gd10/28/90 Le Zenith

As you know, 1990 has two very different parts - before Brent's death, and after. The spring 1990 tour is really popular and has a lot of standout shows - almost any show from march 1990 is worth a listen. The most famous is 3/29/90 with Branford Marsalis - I believe even Cliff has very nice things to say about it. The show from the night after is also very good. 3/24/90 is another well-known show from the tour, it was released as "Dozin at the Knick" but there are still good audience recordings - the "Loser" is one of the best versions ever, and it was omitted from the CD release! 3/22/90 is another tight show with a famous Scarlet->Fire that is bursting with enthusiasm.

The best known show from summer 1990 is 7/12/90 RFK with a big "Dark Star" in the 2nd set. It was released as a "View from the Vault" but the aud is worth hearing. A personal favorite of mine is 7/18/90 at Deer Creek with a wild Space->Other One that jams like it was 1970 instead of 1990.

After Brent's death, the big run at MSG in September is fascinating from the first show to the last - you can really hear the band being reforged and Bruce inspiring everyone. The final shows of the run 9/19/90 and 9/20/90 are very strong (released on a road trips disc) with some intense jamming and 9/20 is one of the better later era "Dark Star" shows.

There is another great run of shows in Oakland at the very end of the year, with a great "time warp" version of Playing in the Band on 12/30/90 and the second show with Branford Marsalis the next night on New Year's, which lives up to performance earlier in the year.

1990 is a year that is strong in all aspects - tight and energetic performances and also a lot more good jamming than the post-75 average. For me, the quality of the improv is more varied and exploratory than 1977, so it is my favorite year in the 75-95 era.

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Poster: Arbuthnot Date: Jul 6, 2011 1:30pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: gd10/28/90 Le Zenith

thanks for the detailed summary, much appreciated! i just checked my list of the GD shows that i have from '90, and it seems i have several shows from march, several shows from july (including that 7/18 deer creek), and then a few scattered shows from the rest of the year, altho 3 of the MSG shows, the 15th, 18th & 20th, which i think i'll move to my harddrive and give a listen to, maybe i'll hear something i like, ha ha

seriously, thanks for the reply, i've copied it for future reference

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Poster: bkidwell Date: Jul 6, 2011 3:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: gd10/28/90 Le Zenith

Thanks, I hope you enjoy some of the shows! For me, the 1990 band is the "Good ol Grateful Dead" - it was that 7/18/90 tape that was the first bootleg I ever heard, probably just a few months after the performance. Starting with the Terrapin (still one of my favorite all-time versions) and on through the Morning Dew, it pretty much blew me out of my chair and stamped the lightning bolt on my skull for life. Since that tape was my "primal" Dead experience, all of the controversial issues like Jerry's old man voice, midi-synth space jams, were part of what I liked on first hearing. Later listening over the years convinced me (like everyone else) that the 68-74 band was even more amazing, but I've never had the difficulty that heads who started out in the olden tymes had in accepting the changes in sound and style.

That "Other One" still astounds me, with Phil and Jerry just ripping these huge intertwined cascades and the drummers making the driving rhythm twist like a snake. From my perspective as a listener now, I can also hear the connection across the decades between the distinctive post-Terrapin jam and the free grooves of the early 70s. Something about this show has always had a really live-wire, edgy psychedelic, bitter taste on the tongue kind of feel to me. I am often drawn back to it, and I enjoy the diversity of sources on the archive, the auds capture some of the sharp tang nicely. I'm cranking

http://www.archive.org/details/gd90-07-18.neumann-fob.gardner.7358.sbeok.shnf

right now and the Morning Dew is just saturated and glowing red hot. Still reaches out and grabs me by the throat.

This post was modified by bkidwell on 2011-07-06 22:14:15

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Poster: hammerfire Date: Jul 8, 2011 10:13pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: gd10/28/90 Le Zenith

Hi bkidwell, I could not agree with you more about hearing '90 first and therefore never having the problem accepting the greatness of that time period for the band. For me '90 is my fave year '86 to '95

In fact, oddly enough I think you and I used to be in a band together (it's Dave by the way)

I deduced this from your screenname and the the musical knowledge apparent from some posts of yours I have come across

If so - how's it going, man? :)


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Poster: Jobygoob Date: Jul 6, 2011 8:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: gd10/28/90 Le Zenith

Nice evaluation of one of my favorite years. I've kind of written off anything post Brent, though I saw and enjoyed many of the shows personally. Maybe I'll give the ones you mentioned another listen.